An Old-Time Weather Forecast

IMG_0070.JPGHave you ever heard that the weather of the latter days of Holy Week is indicative of the rest of the year?

We’re not sure of the origin, but it seems that this has origins in German folklore.  Some of the Sisters here at St. Anne’s can remember hearing about this in years past.

The explanations are actually quite involved.

If the folklore is to be believed, the weather on Holy Thursday can be used to forecast the rest of the spring, that on Good Friday predicts the summer weather, Holy Saturday’s weather is indicative of the coming fall, and Easter Sunday is a sure forecast for the following winter.

And that’s not all…

If the temperatures are above normal on one of these given mornings, then that coming period (i.e., spring, summer) will be unseasonably warm.

The first part of a day in late Holy week corresponds to the first part of the season, if these legends are to be believed.

If it is windy, cloudy, sunny, or the like, the corresponding season can be expected to be likewise.

Have you ever heard any such legends or have any more to share?  Please let us know.

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2 thoughts on “An Old-Time Weather Forecast

  1. I often think of this as a kind of ‘fortune telling’. But, the funny thing about foretelling the weather is that, sometimes, these old wives tales prove to be true. Then they become credible.

    My mom used to say that you never do housework on Sunday and religious days or you will find yourself doing housework all year. Funny, because you have to do housework all year – no matter what!

    My dad watched wildlife instead. The birds that migrated, the fish that schooled and the animals that burrowed gave him clues to long range weather. A sudden silence and disappearance of wildlife was an indicator of danger, perhaps a tornado.

    Always interesting to exchange cultural differences. It helps us to understand each other.

    Like

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