The History of Henry, our Resident of the Month

scare crowOne of our workers caught herself saying ‘hello’ to a motionless form sitting in our main entrance. His name is Henry. This scarecrow has been staying at St. Anne’s during the month of October for the past few years.

Scarecrows, according to one article, have had their place in human society for centuries. Even back in ancient Rome and Greece, people would put wooden figures out to watch over their fields. Scarecrows, or variations thereof, actually cross many cultures. In fact, in Japan, rice field protectors were made of oily material and fish bones, another source said. The first record of scarecrows comes from Ancient Egypt, where wheat fields near the Nile were protected from quail by scarecrows.

European farmers, during the middle ages, followed this well-established tradition. Some actually believed that scarecrows had special powers and actually thought they would protect crops from diseases. A scarecrow ould consist of animal skulls (as in Italy) or a wooden witch (in Germany). In Brittan, scarecrows were actually alive, since boys were given the job of patrolling the wheat fields with bags of stones, according to this same source.

Here, in our own land, the native people used “bird scarers” as well, but these were mostly real men.   Some would stand on wooden platforms, howling and shouting at approaching crows and woodchucks. Other means of protection were also employed, such as poisoning crows so that their wild flying deterred others and placing poles around the fields.

Scarecrows had their place in the history of the American Colonies as well. Later immigrants to America also shared their traditions. During the Great Depression, scarecrows became especially popular.

Although we at St. Anne’s aren’t seeking protection from harm due to birds, or crows in particular, we enjoy having our resident of the month with us this time of year. Some staff, however, have commented on being startled by him.  Sr. Christina, her mother (visiting from Minnesota), and a few residents put him together one afternoon this past week.

scare crow makingIf you stop by to visit us, you might want to say hello to our scarecrow, Henry, as well. Don’t expect any response though, as he is rather bashful and not accustomed to conversation.

2 thoughts on “The History of Henry, our Resident of the Month

  1. I can’t determine which is the photo of Henry the scarecrow. Not one in the photo looks bashful to me…ha, ha!
    And, with that said, I am wondering if we will be having a Halloween trick or a treat?

    Have a happy Halloween!

    Like

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